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Hygiene in Asian societies



Website:
http://www.rchss.sinica.edu.tw/hygiene

The cluster of specific thematic research

     The original collaborative project was sponsored by the Academia Sinica from 2002-2004. It consisted of eight individual projects that covered Taiwan, mainland China (especially the southern coastal areas), and Manchuria from the Ming and Qing dynasties, up to the 1950s. We investigated how various Chinese communities coped with the introduction of Western "public health" to formulate their own modernity, and how the legacy of traditional Chinese medicine in these communities intertwined with the new hygienic concepts and practices, which enabled different strategies to deal with diseases and epidemics. After finishing the project, we moved forward to pursue related issues.

Main Themes
1. Different Chinese societies, including Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore, various cities and treaty ports in China, and even Chinatowns in the Americas, Australia and other parts of the world will be the targets of our investigation.

2. Colonial medicine and public health will be further investigated. The colonial period stood between the late imperial period and the mid-to-late 20th century, and was the most critical period for the development of medicine as a western "science", while public health became an essential part of the modern state machine in due process.

3. Efforts will be concentrated on the history of "health" from the traditional to the modern period. The notion of being "ill" or "unhealthy" will also be scrutinized, as will as the relation between the state and the individual regarding health and "well-being".

4. The history of medical technology from the traditional to the modern period is another focus. How different tools or techniques were invented, introduced, received, or rejected by the various Chinese societies and the reasons behind their reception or rejection will be studied in detail. These will include important technology and inventions such as vaccinations, syringe needles, milk bottles for babies, various forms of pharmaceutical forms (pills, liquids, capsules, powder etc.), thermometers, and so on. How and why Chinese societies have chosen some of the above techniques and rejected others during the specific historical period is an important indicator of the cultural, political and economic development of these societies.


Researchers

Michael Shi-yung Liu
(Chairperson; Joint Appointment Research Fellow; Institute of Taiwan History; specialty: History)
Jen-der Lee

(Joint Appointment Research Fellow; Institute of History and Philology; specialty: History)
Angela Ki Che Leung
(Academician; Director and Chair Professor, Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences, The University of Hong Kong; specialty: History)
Ping-yi Chu
( Joint Appointment Research Fellow; Institute of History and Philology; specialty: History)
Wen-Shan Yang
(Research Fellow; Institute of Sociology; specialty: Sociology)
Shang-Jen Li
(Associate Research Fellow; Institute of History and Philology; specialty: History)
Sean Hsiang-lin Lei
(Associate Research Fellow; Institute of Modern History; specialty: History)
Che-chia Chang
(Associate Research Fellow; Institute of Modern History; specialty: History)
Shao-hua Liu
(Associate Research Fellow; Institute of Ethnology; specialty: Anthropology)
Yu-Yueh Tsai
(Assistant Research Fellow; Institute of Sociology; specialty: Sociology)
Robert John Perrins
(Professor; Department of History and classics,  Acadia University; specialty: History)
Chia-Ling Wu
(Associate Professor; Department of Sociology, National Taiwan University; specialty: Sociology)
Ruth Rogaski
(Associate Professor; Department of History, Vanderbilt University; specialty: History)
Wen-ji Wang
(Associate Professor; Institute of Science, Technology, and Society, National Yang-Ming University; specialty: History)
Wen-hua Kuo
(Associate Professor; Institute of Science, Technology, and Society, National Yang-Ming University; specialty: History)
Yi-ping Lin
(Associate Professor; Institute of Science, Technology, and Society, National Yang-Ming University; specialty: Public Hygiene)
Ya-Wen Cheng
(Associate Professor; Institute of Health Policy and Management, National Taiwan University; specialty: Public Hygiene)
Wu Yan-Chiou
(Postdoctoral Fellow)
Shen Chia-San
(Postdoctoral Fellow)
Huang Ching-Lan
(Graduate Student, Institute of Sociology, Tunghai University)

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